High-caffeine energy drinks not good for drivers

High-caffeine energy drinks not good for drivers

Louisiana drivers may drink an energy drink now and then to give themselves a boost of energy, but they should know that these drinks should not be relied upon every day. Although the FDA regulates the amount of caffeine that can be put in soft drinks, the makers of energy drinks can find ways to circumvent the law.

The effects of caffeine intoxication

One way is for makers to market their products as supplements, not soft drinks. While a 12-ounce soft drink may only carry around 71 milligrams of caffeine, a drink marketed as a supplement could have double that amount. Consumers of these drinks may then suffer from caffeine intoxication, which is characterized by irritability and a breaking down of inhibitions that leads to more risk-taking. Consumers may also slur their speech or have twitching muscles.

Soft drinks and driver fatigue

It’s easy to see how irritability and risk-taking put drivers at risk for a crash. Another way that these energy drinks can betray drivers is by increasing the fatigue they feel after their energy boost. Many drivers describe it as a crashing effect where they realize their fatigue more clearly than ever. This drowsiness can lead to difficulty concentrating and making good decisions on the road. The bottom line is that drivers should not substitute energy drinks for sleep.

Legal help for car crash victims

Drowsy and inattentive driving are behind many auto accidents. If you were the victim of another’s negligence, you may be eligible for compensation for your medical bills, lost wages and pain and suffering. A lawyer, by evaluating your case, may determine a fair amount in damages and then work to negotiate on your behalf for that amount. If negotiations fail, you might consider litigation.

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